Swimming Pool Compass Mosaics Bring Seafaring Adventure into Your Space

Swimming Pool Compass Mosaics Bring Seafaring Adventure into Your Space

Despite advancements in the Global Positioning System (GPS), a component of the global navigation satellite system (GNSS), the compass remains a trusted companion. It’s such an integral part of our history that its design appears widely in architecture, artistic works, and travel literature. Hence, it’s only fitting for us to venerate the compass as elegant and colorful swimming pool compass mosaics. Swimming pool compass mosaics perfectly personify the high adventures of not only the seafaring folks but anyone who travels to uncharted territories.

The First Civilization To Invent the Magnetic Compass

The four cardinal directions have been an integral aspect of humanity’s story since recorded history. The history of navigation is the history of seafaring and the desert nomads; it’s the art of commanding vessels across oceans and caravans traversing the wilderness.

In the earliest history of exploration, navigators charted routes using astronomy and geometry. It was the Chinese Han and Tang Dynasties that are credited by historians as developing the first magnetic compass (roughly 200 BCE).

By 1040 CE, the Song Dynasty began using the magnetic compass for navigational orienteering (the discipline of following a route through unfamiliar terrain). Throughout the millennia, the compass hasn’t changed much, technologically speaking. 

Who Brought the Compass to Europe?

By the 14th century, compasses had begun to emerge across Europe. Although a few historians assert that Europeans independently invented their own iron ore compasses several centuries after the Chinese, most agree that the Chinese shared the compass with the Arabs, who eventually introduced the technology to Europeans.

Either way, the arrival of the compass was a pivotal moment in European maritime travel, as it allowed seafarers to travel throughout the year. In addition to that, the magnetic compass better equipped them to sail the open seas out of sight of land. The compass helped usher in the Age of Exploration or the early modern period, helping navigators chart sea routes to Japan, China, and Indonesia; this allowed merchants to establish the international trade of spices, silk, and tea.

It was also around this time that the Spanish began coming into contact with the Inca and Aztecs. European explorers were gaining knowledge of the wonders and natural resources that were available in North America. The compass helped increase sea travel and the number of available trade routes, which led to the European settlement of North America.

How Does a Compass Work?

Magnetic compasses detect and respond to the magnetic field of the Earth. The Earth’s gravitational pressure causes it to have an iron core that is part liquid and part solid crystal. Scientists conclude that movement within the liquid outer core is what produces the Earth’s magnetic field, which has two poles—north and south.

Even though the Earth’s magnetic poles are slightly different from its axis of rotation, they’re close enough to the geographic poles to be a valuable navigation tool. When certain adjustments are made to make up for the polar differences, the accuracy of a compass can be somewhat accurate. However, most compasses don’t point exactly towards the North Pole.

According to The Guardian, “Over the past few hundred years in the UK, all compass needles have pointed west of true north.” Nonetheless, as the article went on to report, compasses at Greenwich pointed true north for the first time in over 360 years. “And for some parts of the UK, this may not happen for another 20 years. Either way, it is a once-in-a-lifetime event,” The Guardian continued.

Thus, it’s important to understand the difference between geographic north and magnetic north: the direction that a magnetic compass needle points to as it aligns with the magnetic field of Earth. The Magnetic North Pole isn’t a fixed point because the Earth’s magnetic field fluctuates in response to changes in its magnetic core.

This difference between true north and the north heading on a compass forms an angle, referred to as declination. Declination varies from place to place because the Earth’s magnetic field is not uniform – it dips and undulates.

Some of Our Swimming Pool Compass Mosaic Designs

There’s no better way to add a decorative touch to your new or refinished swimming pool than by adding a mosaic. While some pool owners may prefer mermaids, fish, turtles, or dolphins, those who prefer elegance might fancy a compass mosaic. Blue Water Pool Mosaics offers the largest selection of ceramic and glass pool compass mosaics anywhere. A family-owned company since 1981, we take pride in delivering the highest quality swimming pool compass mosaics available.

Rose Compass 1

rose swimming pool compass mosaic

 

The Rose Compass 1 is a part of our medallion pool mosaics and is handcrafted in the USA by skilled artisans using durable, high-quality glazed ceramic tile. All swimming pool mosaics arrive pre-assembled and adhered to a mesh backing for easy installation. The Rose Compass 1 is ¼ inch thick, made of hand-glazed ceramic, and frost-proof.

The Rose Compass 1 comes in five different sizes:

  • 24″ x 24″ – $301.87
  • 36″ x 36″ – $467.25
  • 48″ x 48″ – $672.00
  • 60″ x 60″ – $918.75
  • 72″ x 72″ – $1,323.00

Rose Compass 2

rose swimming pool compass mosaic 2

The Rose Compass 2 is a part of our medallion pool mosaics and is handcrafted in the USA by skilled artisans using durable, high-quality glazed ceramic tile. All swimming pool mosaics arrive pre-assembled and adhered to a mesh backing for easy installation. The Rose Compass 2 is ¼ inch thick, made of hand-glazed ceramic, and frost-proof.

The Rose Compass 2 comes in five different sizes:

  • 24″ x 24″ – $301.87
  • 36″ x 36″ – $467.25
  • 48″ x 48″ – $672.00
  • 60″ x 60″ – $918.75
  • 72″ x 72″ – $1,323.00

Compass Medallion 5

compass medallion

The Compass Medallion 5 is a part of our medallion pool mosaics and is handcrafted in the USA by skilled artisans using durable, high-quality glazed ceramic tile. All swimming pool mosaics arrive pre-assembled and adhered to a mesh backing for easy installation. The Compass Medallion 5 is ¼ inch thick, made of hand-glazed ceramic, and frost-proof.

The Compass Medallion 5 comes in five different sizes:

  • 24″ x 24″ – $301.87
  • 36″ x 36″ – $467.25
  • 48″ x 48″ – $672.00
  • 60″ x 60″ – $918.75
  • 72″ x 72″ – $1,323.00

Eight Point Compass

Eight Point Compass

The Eight Point Compass is a part of our medallion pool mosaics and is handcrafted in the USA by skilled artisans using durable, high-quality glazed ceramic tile. All swimming pool mosaics arrive pre-assembled and adhered to a mesh backing for easy installation. The Eight Point Compass is ¼ inch thick, made of hand-glazed ceramic, and frost-proof. It’s only available in a 42″ x 41″ size and costs $616.22 with free shipping.

Bring a Bit of Seafaring History into Your Space With Swimming Pool Compass Mosaics

Swimming pool compass mosaics from Blue Pool Water Mosaics are a marvelous touch for your swimming pool or hot tub. Bring high adventure to your swimming pool, minus the dangers that come with it. Whatever the reason, whatever the season, there’s a mosaic for you. Contact us today to learn more about our swimming pool compass mosaics and more!

September 21, 2022 | Blue Water Pool Mosaics

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